What is the Spot Price of Silver?

 

When people refer to the silver spot price, or the spot price of any metal for that matter, they are referring to the price at which the metal may be exchanged and delivered upon now.  In other words, the spot price is the price at which silver is currently trading. Spot prices are often referred to in the silver and gold markets, as well as crude oil and other commodities. Price is in a constant state of discovery and is watched by banks, financial institutions, dealers and retail investors.

All of the products on our website are priced based on a premium to spot price, and therefore you will notice that prices update every few seconds during market hours. This allows customers to invest based on the most up to date market conditions possible.

Silver Spot Price FAQ

How is the spot silver price calculated?

Silver is a commodity that trades virtually 24 hours per day across many exchanges such as New York, Chicago, London, Zurich and Hong Kong. The most important exchange, however, when it comes to determining the spot silver price is COMEX. The spot price of silver is calculated using the near term futures contract price. By near term, that may mean the front month contract or the nearest contract with the most volume.

How often do spot silver prices change?

The price of silver is constantly changing. The spot price of silver changes every few seconds during market hours. Between domestic and foreign exchanges, spot silver prices update Sunday through Friday, from 6PM EST to 5:15PM EST each day. Spot prices remain static during that 45 minute down period from 5:15PM EST to 6PM EST each weekday, as well as from 5:15PM EST on Friday until 6PM EST on Sunday. Although silver and other markets may have periods in which they are very quiet, they also have periods in which prices change very rapidly.

What currency are spot silver prices quoted in?

The silver spot price is usually quoted in U.S. dollars (USD). However, markets all over the world can take the spot silver price in USD and simply convert it to local currency.

What exactly is the spot silver price referring to?

The spot silver price is quoting the price for 1 troy ounce of .999 fine silver.

Are spot silver prices the same all over the world?

Yes, the price of silver is the same all over the world. Exchanges and markets all over the world can take the current spot silver price in USD and convert the price in USD to local currency.

Why can’t I buy silver at the spot silver price?

Silver is sold by dealers with a premium to the current spot price. When one is looking to sell metals to a dealer, the dealer may offer spot or slightly below the spot price for one’s metals.  The dealer premium as it is often called represents the price at which a dealer will buy silver and the price at which a dealer will sell silver. The difference between the spread represents the dealer’s gross profit. This is how dealers make profits and stay in business.

What is the difference between bid and ask prices?

The bid price is the maximum offer available for a particular commodity at the present time. The ask price is the minimum asking price available for a particular commodity at the present time. More simply, if you want to buy, you will pay the ask price. If you want to sell, you will receive the bid price.

The difference between the two is referred to as the “bid-ask spread”, and often is a reliable indicator of an investment’s liquidity. The smaller the bid-ask spread is, the more liquid a commodity and the less “transaction fees” an investor will incur when getting into and out of investment positions.

Silver Price Factors FAQ

 

What are some things that can cause silver prices to change?

The price of silver is always in flux never sitting stagnant for very long. There are many different factors that can potentially affect silver price fluctuations. These factors may include, but are certainly not limited to: supply and demand, currency fluctuations, inflation fears, geopolitical risks, and asset allocations.

Do mining companies have any say in the price of silver?

The price of silver is determined by the laws of supply and demand. That being said, if the price of silver drops too low, then mining companies may elect to slow down operations and simply mine less silver. The fact is, if the price of silver gets too low then these companies may mine silver but operate at a loss due to mining costs. Should silver fall to very low price, then these mining companies may scale back operations in an attempt to wait for higher prices or slow the supply of their silver reserves to the market thus helping to bring the forces of supply and demand back into balance.

Why does silver trade around the clock?

The demand for silver is constantly changing. World markets are in a constant state of price discovery. Many other commodities and investment products also trade around the clock.

Is the price of silver too volatile for most investors?

While silver prices can be volatile at times, there are also times when prices are relatively quiet. In addition, many customers buying physical silver are buying it as a long-term investment and understand that short-term price fluctuations may be volatile.

When looking at silver prices and trying to make a forecast, I have heard people speak of the gold/silver ratio. What exactly is this?

The gold/silver ratio is simply a formula for determining how many ounces of silver it takes to buy one ounce of gold. Simply take the price of gold and divide by the price of silver — that is the ratio. Investors may use the ratio to try and determine the relative value of silver or gold and see if a potential buying opportunity may exist.

Someone told me silver prices are trending lower-is this true?

Silver has certainly seen some ups and downs in its price over the years. Since 2011 silver prices trended lower for years after nearly reaching the $50 per ounce mark. Lately the silver price has been going sideways for some time.

Other Silver Price FAQ

How many grams are in a troy ounce of silver?

Silver is measured in troy ounces. Each troy ounce contains about 31.1034768 grams of silver, which is slightly higher than a standard ounce which has only 28 grams.

How many troy ounces are in a kilogram of silver?

There are 32.151 troy ounces in one kilogram of silver.

If spot silver is at $20 per ounce, why are some coins selling for over double that amount or more?

The spot price of silver may be only one factor to determine the value of a silver coin. Silver coins can have value not only for their silver content but also for any collectability or scarcity that they may have. While regular silver bullion coins will usually be not too far from the current spot price, a collector’s numismatic silver coin may sell for the spot price many times over. This is once again the laws of supply and demand at work.

Does the face value of a silver coin affect its worth?

Silver coins generally carry a small face value making them legal tender in their respective country of origin. That said, legal tender silver coins are generally priced based on their silver content. Although silver coins may be legal tender, they are not typically used in day to day transactions as typically their precious metal content value is far greater than their legal tender face value.

Can I put silver in my IRA?

Yes. To learn more, read our Gold & Silver IRA Section

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Copyright © 2019 The Oxford Gold Group - All Rights Reserved. The statements made on this website are opinions and past performance is no indication of future performance or returns. Precious metals, like all investments, carry risk. Gold, silver and platinum coins and bars may appreciate, depreciate or stay the same depending on a variety of factors. The Oxford Gold Group cannot guarantee and makes no representation, that any metals purchased will appreciate at all or appreciate sufficiently to make customers a profit. The decision to purchase or sell precious metals, and which precious metals to purchase or sell, are the customer's decision alone, and purchases and sales should be made subject to the customer's own research, prudence, and judgment.